Many of my posts are coming from my flickr page. To see them enlarged with a black background just click on the photo and then when the flickr page with the photo appears click on the photo again. I hope you enjoy.

Saturday, July 31, 2010

One Day Early

Lately I've been trying to post a new banner photo the first of each month. I know, today is the 31st so hence the title. After all . . . I couldn't compete with Sunset Sunday tomorrow (duh!). I've got another beauty lined up and so I decided to put up the new banner today. Obviously you can see the banner at the top of the page, and the photos that make it up are here just in case you want to see them a little closer.  Of course you can click to enlarge (or embiggen) them.







All of these were taken at Thanksgiving Point last week.
Have a wonderful day, weekend and week, and I hope to see you tomorrow for Sunset Sunday.



Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Friday, July 30, 2010

Phun Phriday # 25 - One Third the Time

(f5.0, 1/50, 16mm, ISO 160)


My wife is always wanting me to wash her car. I've finally figured out a way to do it in just 1/3 the time.

It's PHUN PHRIDAY!!! That's the day we think outside the box and have Phun with Photography. Yes I know, Photography should always be Phun and it certainly is for me, but on Phun Prhiday! we make it EXTRA Phun by doing something a little different. Have you done something Phun, wierd and/or creative lately? If so, leave a link to it in your comment. If not - well I'd really love to hear from you anyway. I hope you had Phun with this one like I did.

OBTW, this one was inspired by Dave.

Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

Where the Buffalo Roam





(f5.6, 1/4, 42mm, ISO 160)


You probably thought you were going to see some buffalo or actually bison. Sorry to disappoint. This is Antelope Island where there are hundreds of Bison that do roam. This was taken last night while the sun was setting, about 15 minutes prior to the photo you'll find on Chad's blog.  As you can see it was kind of an exciting evening.









Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

One Way to Frame Your Photos


Several people have asked for a tutorial on how I creat the frame that I use on the photos. This is actually quite easy.

I use Adobe Photoshop CS4 and these instructions will be using that program. If you have Photoshop Elements or another version of Photoshop or GIMP or some other program that allows you to use layers you'll have to adapt but it can probably be done. I know that JU-North is doing it with Paint Shop Pro here. NOTE: There are several different ways to do some of the steps I'll tell you about here, so if you know a different or better way, go for it. It's the end results that count. Since I am not a pro at Photoshop I just bully my way through and sometimes I find an easy way and sometimes there are easier ways.

Step 1: Select and Open the photo you are going to frame
Open your photo in Photoshop. If you are going to make any other changes to it that require any additional layers then go ahead and do all that first. Once you are done and have your final photo where you want it make sure you flatten the image (combine all layers into one) by going to the tool bar click layer and then click flatten image. If "flatten image" is ghosted then you only have one layer or it is already flattened. NOTE: If you want to save a copy of the work you've done including all the layers, do that before flattening it, and then save the flattened image with a new name.

Step 2: Duplicate the Photo so you have one on top of the other
Your image should now be your "Background" Layer and it should be highlighted as it is the only layer in the Layers palette. Right click on the Background layer and from the drop down menu click on Duplicate Layer. A window will open asking you if you want to name it Background Copy. I change mine to Foreground, but you can name it whatever you want. For the rest of this tutorial I'm going to assume you named it Foreground. The new Foreground layer will be above the Background layer and will now be highlighted.

Step 3: Re-size the new copy of the photo so that it is smaller than the original
With the foreground layer selected (highlighted) go to the Menu Bar and click Edit > Transform > Scale. Two things will happen; One, A new Options Bar will open just under the Menu Bar and Two, tiny little boxes will appear at the four corners and the horizontal and vertical midpoints of the Layer. If you place your mouse over any one of those tiny boxes the pointer will turn into two arrows going opposite directions showing which ways you can re-size your layer. However, for this application I prefer to use the Options bar to do the resizing. You will notice about seven boxes with numbers inside there is one labeled "W" with a 100.0% inside and one labeled "H" also with a 100.0% inside. In between them is an icon that looks like three links of a chain. When "On" if you change the percentage in one box it will match it in the other. You can tell if it is "On" because it will also be inside a small box. Click on it to turn it "Off". If you are using a Horizontal photo like the one above, Enter something like 95 in the "W" (Width) box and 92 in the "H" (Height) box. Take a look at what you have and adjust to your preference. Once you are happy with the size of the Foreground hit your enter key to complete.

Step 4: Add a "Style" to the Foreground Layer
By adding a Style to the Foreground layer you can give it some separation from the background. You can use one that comes with PhotoShop or create your own. I created my own which I named PhotoFrameShadow, but you can just start with something like Clear Emboss, or just add a drop shadow. If that is too difficult right now don't worry about it because the next step will add some separation anyway.

Step 5: Blur the Background Layer
Go to the Layers palette and select the Background layer. Make sure that the Foreground is no longer selected, only the Background. Now go to the Menu bar and select Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Choose an amount that you like. If your preview button is checked you will see the amount of blur. I use a 9.

Optional Step 1: If you want to darken, lighten or add color to your background, now is an excellent time to do it since the background is selected. Decide what color you want or use black if you just want to darken it or white if you just want to lighten it and make that your foreground color in your toolbox. Now select the rectangle tool and drag it over the entire photo. Since only the background layer is selected it will only show on the background layer and your foreground will remain as it was. Chances are that whatever color you chose will now totally hide the background layer. This can be adjusted to your liking by Layers palette and selecting the new layer that just appeared above your Background layer - probably called Shape 1 or something like that - double click on that and a window named Layer Style will open. (If it doesn't do that the first time, try clicking in a different place. I find it works best if you click above the title "Shape 1" as close to the top of that layer box as possible.) Once the Layer Style window appears go to the General Blending box near the middle top and make sure the blending mode is set to Normal and then adjust the opacity percentage by typing in the amount you want or by sliding the indicator back and forth until you get it where you want it. I use a different amount every time depending on the color and the background etc. For the photo above I liked it when it was at 79%.

Optional Step 2: If you have a watermark or copyright signature to add go ahead and do it now, but first make sure you go to the Layers Palette and select the Foreground layer.

Finishing Up:  If you want to save it with all the layers etc. in tact then make sure and do that now as a Photoshop file. Do that before you re-size it. At this point I re-size it down to the size I'm going to publish it to my blog in and then save it as a JPEG file which automatically flattens it down to one layer again.

Good luck and have fun. Don't be afraid to experiment.  Some Great examples of wild and different ways to use these basic ideas are done by Krista at Picture Imperfect .  Make sure you go to some of her "older posts" to get some more great ideas.

If you have questions, I may have answers, particularly with Photoshop CS4.  I can't answer any specific how-to's with any other software.





Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Monday, July 26, 2010

Monday Morning Quarterbacking #2

Just in case you don't remember or this is your first time to see "Monday Morning Quarterbacking" you may want to click here to see what it's all about.


Do you know how hard it is to critique your own work? I mean really critique it, like the meanest judge at a competition. Well it is hard. I decided today that if I was going to do another Monday Morning Quarterbacking feature I'd better bite the bullet and get after it. To try to be as objective as possible I simply went to "Edit Posts" and pulled up my last 100 posts. Then I closed my eyes and scrolled my mouse up and down several times and clicked. The post that come up was one I did just a month ago today and the photo is the one you see above. Fortunately it only took me a couple seconds to see some problems with this photo.

Before I tear into it let me say that I like this photo - obviously I like it or I would not have posted it.  This critiquing feature is not about saying how terrible something is, but about taking a second look - like Monday Morning Quarterbacking - and seeing how we could have made it better.

First thing I noticed was the frame.  When I posted this photo I was just starting to do some of the coloring and/or shading of the background frame.  I would go into the photo and find some color and then use it for the coloration of the background frame.  Do you see that bit of lichen on the rock on the right side?  That is what I used for the color for this frame.  I must have been in a hurry or something, because as I look back now I can see that it did not add to this photo it detracted from it.

One of the things that made me post this photo was the texture of the sand under the clear water and also the reflections of the rocks, trees and sky in the water.  However, I find that the brightness and texture of the sand in the bottom left corner is slightly distracting.  It would have been very easy to add just a little darkening vignette to the two bottom corners which would have helped keep the eye in the photo not out toward the edges and corners.

Finally, and maybe the worst is this photo suffers in the composition department.  Have you heard of the rule of thirds?  (If not click here.)  As you can see I jacked this one up pretty bad.  Since about the only thing that would qualify as a center of interest is where the stream disappears into the rock at the end, it should not be right smack in the middle.

Let's face it.  This photo has some very interesting elements that grabbed our attention, but with a little effort in the right places, and a little more time taken perhaps it could have been substantially improved.

The best way to make the compositional fixes would have been in the camera at the time of the shoot, but this cropped and Bridge-altered version may help you see it a little.




And there is still one more element to Monday Morning Quarterbacking - If you have a photo you would like seriously critiqued from one man's photographic/artistic viewpoint you may either put a link to it in your comment, email me a link or simply email me the photo. You'll find an email link just below or in my profile.  Please tell me if you want it critiqued publicly or privately.  You must promise not to be mad at me if I tell you something you didn't want to hear.  You do not have to agree with me - photography and art are very subjective.



Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!F

Sunday, July 25, 2010

Sunset Sunday - 23











(f7.1, 1/500, 70mm, ISO 160)
It's Sunset Sunday again at Finding Another View.  This was taken just a few days ago on the causeway out to Antelope Island in The Great Salt Lake.  This is SOOC except cropped to 16 X 9 ratio and the border and watermark added.

Do you have a beautiful sunset you'd like to share.  Just leave a link or a URL in your comment so we can go and see it. - Don't have one yet, well we'd love to read your comment anyway.

Note:  If you don't know how to leave a link in a comment and would like to learn click here.











Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Saturday, July 24, 2010

How I made Monochrome Lake

Several people were anxious to know the steps to create "Monochrome Lake" that was on my Phun Phriday! post yesterday. I'll make this as short and complete as possible.

I use Adobe Photoshop CS4 and these instructions will be using that program. If you have Photoshop Elements or another version of Photoshop or GIMP or some other program that allows you to use layers you'll have to adapt but it can probably be done.  NOTE:  There are several different ways to do some of the steps I'll tell you about here, so if you know a different or better way, go for it.  It's the end results that count.  Since I am not a pro at Photoshop I just bully my way through and sometimes I find an easy way and sometimes there are easier ways.

I always shoot in RAW format and so the first thing I have to do is process through Adobe Bridge to create a JPEG image.  While in bridge I usually enhance the blacks, the contrast, clarity and vibrance.  I also crop almost all of my horizontal photos to a 16 X 9 ratio as opposed to the standard 4 X 3 that the camera originates them in.

When I was through with my Bridge processing I had this image to begin the "Photoshoping".


The next step is to create two copies of this image, name one of them B&W and the other Color (or whatever you want).  You create the new layers by right clicking on the existing layer and selecting "Duplicate Layer".  Remember to do this twice. 

You will now have three layers.  The background layer, the layer named color and the layer named B&W.  Go ahead and delete the Background layer if you want.  It doesn't make any difference, but it may save space.  Make sure the one you named B&W is below the layer you named Color.  NOTE:  Unlike the image below the image shown next to the layer name will still be in color on both layers until after the next step.



Now select the layer you named B&W and then go to the tool bar and select layer > adjustments > Black & White.  You may want to click the little eye next to the Color layer so it is hidden and you can see that the B&W layer is not Black and White.  Once you've checked to be sure it is B&W, click the eye on the color layer again so that it is visible on top.  Of course your Layers palette will now look like the one above also.


Now we need to create a layer mask on the COLOR LAYER, which you do by going to the Layers palette and first selecting the Color Layer and then clicking on the little square box  with the circle inside it at the bottom of the palette.  Once you do that a white box will appear next to the image in the Color Layer.


Before proceeding you must make certain that your color palette is correct and to be correct the foreground color must be black.  I believe the quickest way to do that is hit the D key, which should give you something like this.  Without the red arrow of course ;^) .  If it doesn't just select the foreground block and make it black.

Finally, we're ready for the fun part.  All you have to do now is remove the part of the color photo that you don't want to be in color any more and the black & white will show through.  To do that you select the Brush tool, then change the size to whatever you want.  Make sure the Color layer is selected and start painting in black.  You won't see black lines like you would expect, you'll see the background photo becoming visible.  If you look over in the layer mask box on the Layers pallet you will see the white box start to fill in with black where you've painted.


You may want to make your brush very small and zoom in close when you're getting close to the edge.  Also, in this particular image there was a very difficult area over on the right side of the lake where it was quite marshy so there is a lot of grass but also a lot of water reflecting the color.  I could have zoomed in real tight and tried to change each pixel, but I'm too lazy so instead I tried to do that the best I could in the areas where I could, but in the overall area I simply change my opacity on the brush to about 50% and carefully went over the area until it looked the way I wanted.  Remember if you make a mistake you can always hit edit > undo or CTRL - ALT - Z to back up.

Once I'm happy with what I have I save it in both  the .PSD file so I have all the layers and work, and I also save it in JPEG because I need a separate stand alone JPEG image to do the framing and watermark before posting it on the blog.

If there is interest in how I do the framing let me know and I can do a tutorial on that also.  It is really pretty easy and I know of people who use Paint Shop to do it also, but since I don't use that I don't know how.

Remember if you want to see the finished product again just click here.

I did this in a hurry so if there are any errors or anything you don't understand, comment or email me.  The email link is below.








Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Friday, July 23, 2010

Phun Phriday! #24 - Monochrome Lake





(f4, 1/50, 14mm, ISO 160)


There are many gorgeous places all around this world, but Utah certainly has one of the widest variety. Even though I love to travel and see the world, I do feel lucky to live here.

You may not know that there is a place in South Central Utah that is so colorful in the variety of minerals that it is called Kodachrome Basin. I guess somebody figured it wasn't fair to have a Kodachrome and not have the opposite which would be Monochrome.  As I mentioned the other day, there are dozens and dozens of lakes in the high Uinta mountains, there's Mirror Lake,  Butterfly Lake, Moosehorn Lake, just to name a few.  To me the most interesting and amazing of all is Monochrome Lake.  If you ever get the chance to visit the High Uinta mountains in Eastern Utah, don't miss the thrill of Monochrome Lake.

Phun Phriday! is all about thinking outside the box.  Have you done something Phun, wierd, creative lately?  If so, leave a link to it in your comment.  If not - well I'd really love to hear from you anyway.  I hope you had Phun with this one like I did.

I decided that since this was such a unique reflection I'd submit it to Weekend Reflections this week.





Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Thursday, July 22, 2010

The Emeralds Are Jealous





(f5.6, 1/80, 14mm, ISO 160)


When we were on the Oregon coast last month and the tide was so far out leaving many beautiful tide pools, I was absolutely taken by the pools and the green of the seaweed draped over the sea floor. Last time I saw green this beautiful was either when I landed in Ireland in April many years ago, or in the jewelry store seeing the emeralds.





Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

First Trip to Thanksgiving Point



(f5.6, 1/80, 14mm, ISO 160)


You've seen a post or two from Karen about a place near her called Thanksgiving Point.  It's a little farther for me - about 60 miles.  Went there today with Chad and it certainly is a beautiful place.  Here are a few photos to whet your appetite.  There will be more in future posts.



(f6.3, 1/640, 50mm, ISO 160)




(f5.0, 1/60, 50mm, ISO 160)




Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

The Mighty Columbia



(f3.5, 1/6, 14mm, ISO 160)


As I was standing on the abutment of the railroad bridge waiting for the sun to get even lower for one of the shots of the sunset and bridge you see in my header above,  I decided the heavy steel and rivets and the reflection on the mighty Columbia River were interesting. The river is softened a bit by the length of the exposure.



Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Monday, July 19, 2010

Monday Morning Quarterbacking

For quite a while I've been thinking about trying a new thing on my blog. I was going to call it "Masochistic Monday" or "Massacre Monday" - My wife hated both those names - Then just today I thought of the name "Monday Morning Quarterbacking" - I didn't ask her what she thought of this one.

You probably know that a "Monday Morning Quarterback" is the guy sitting at home in his Lazy Boy recliner telling the quarterback and everybody else what he should have done to win that game yesterday. That's real easy when you're not in the heat of the battle. You've done it yourself in one way or another, maybe even to yourself. After you leave the boss's office you say "Boy, I should have said. . ."



Here is what Monday Morning Quarterbacking is all about on my blog. Some Mondays (I'm not committing myself to every week.) I'm going to take a photo of my own that I have posted, or that I took hoping for something special and got a flop, or that my wife tells me just didn't come out all that great, and I'm going to critique the crap out of it. (I truly do appreciate that my wife is pretty honest about my photos - that way when she says they are beautiful I can believe her. The way I know that the photo is really good is when she says "That's beautiful. . .Who took it?")

One of the best ways to learn - and one of the hardest things to do -  is to step back and give a photo an honest critique, especially your own.

Another element to Monday Morning Quarterbacking is that I encourage you to add to my critique. Sometimes it's just too hard to say the really tough things about your own photo or you're so emotionally involved you don't see it, so I welcome your honest critique - I appreciate it!

And there is still one more element to Monday Morning Quarterbacking - If you have a photo you would like seriously critiqued from one man's photographic/artistic viewpoint you may either put a link to it in your comment, email me a link or simply email me the photo. You'll find an email link just below or in my profile. You must promise not to be mad at me if I tell you something you didn't want to hear.  You do not have to agree with me - photography and art are very subjective.




Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Monday Morning Quarterbacking #1

What??? you've never heard of my "Monday Morning Quarterbacking" feature?  Well, this is #1 so read the post above.

While I was in southern Utah a few months back I ran across this little cave and I thought that it was very interesting because of the way it was formed and the colorful stratified rock so I snapped a pic of it.

(f4.3, 1/100, 125mm, ISO 160)


Going back and looking at the photo I can clearly see that it is basically pretty boring.  A real yawner.  One big problem right off the bat is that the lighting is very flat.  It so happened that when this photo was taken the sky was very overcast and so the lighting is very even, giving us hardy any shape.  It also flattens out the colors.  Everything is in midtones - very boring.  It doesn't really guide your eye to anything except possibly the cave which is right smack dab in the middle of the photo - again very boring.  Again, there is nothing really interesting in the shot to hold the viewer except possibly the cave itself, and that would only hold you for a very short time.  It would be enhanced by a POI (Point of Interest).  It could be slightly enhanced in Photoshop, Bridge or Lightroom by picking up a little contrast and perking up the colors a little, but that wouldn't help on the lack of a POI.

Fortunately I did get a chance to take it again a little later when a few friends showed up for a little hike with their dog.

(f11, 1/100, 114mm, ISO 160)


Now having a POI the photo might be worth doing a little with.  First I cropped to make sure the POI was in an aesthetically pleasing location for composition.  Next I punched up the colors and the contrast just a touch to give it more interest.  As you remember on the first one the lighting was very flat so on this one I was able to get just a touch more lighting on the edge of the rock on the left side to enhance the visual of the shape. Also, to keep the eye in the photograph longer and lead to the POI the corners were very subtly darkened.

Most of the photos I critique in the future will not have the new and improved version, but since I had the chance to do it that way this time I did.

Please feel free to add any other critiques you may have noticed that I missed, and if you have a photo you'd seriously like critiqued let me know by link, by comment, or by email.

Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Sunday, July 18, 2010

Sunset Sunday - 22



(f5.6, 1/30, 42mm, ISO 160)


This is one of those rare Sunset Sunday shots that was actually taken on a Sunday as well as posted on one. This was taken a week ago today on our Uinta Mountain camping trip.

If you have a Sunset photo you'd like to share, I'd love to see it. Please leave a link to it in your comment. If you don't know how to leave a link just tell us it's there and we'll go find it.  No Sunset photo to share??? I'd love to read your comment anyway.








Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Saturday, July 17, 2010

Still Just a Flower Child



(f8, 1/320, 50mm, ISO 160)




(f5.0, 1/500, 50mm, ISO 160)


You probably had to live in the "60s" to understand the title of today's post. These photos go back to my little walk down the street to the "wild flowers" from about a week ago. I posted several from that jaunt earlier this week. A little less weird than yesterdays abstract on Phun Phriday!  I still have plenty of scenic shots from my Uinta trip, including tomorrow's Sunset Sunday.

Side note - Be careful what you tell your children, they might believe you.  When I was a child my dad would tease that dragon flies would sew your mouth or your eyes shut.  I think I was in my forties before I wasn't afraid of these things.  Of course now I think they are beautiful and I have no fear at all, but it took a while.



Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Friday, July 16, 2010

Phun Phriday! #23 - Modern Abstract

It's Phun Phriday!  The day I get to go weird on you.  It may be hard to believe but this is a photo of nature and it was really quite simple to make.  Of course I played around for a while and tried different things, but once I decided what to do it only took a few seconds.  I created this using a similar method to some stuff I have done before.  I took two photographs of the same thing; one was in focus and the other was way out of focus (See below).  I went into Photoshop and put the blurred one on top of the focused one, left them both at 100% opacity and then selected the blend mode called "luminosity".  Of course I used the same old method I've been using for months to add the frame.  In this case I used a complimentary color, which I picked up from the little touch of green in the upper corner, to help create a little separation. 

I know that for some of you this is not your cup of tea.  But that's what Phun Phriday! is all about.  Trying new things and seeing what you get.  Personally I can see this hanging on the wall at a modern art gallery in San Francisco or New York. . . Huh, what do you think? ? ?  How much should I ask for it on canvas in a 30" X 17"?

Here are the two photos it was made from.  Remember the one is the exact same thing as the other with the camera in manual focus and then adjusted so it is way out of focus. You will note that the originals are a little more square looking than the finished product above. Just a little free information here . . . Your camera takes photos in a 4 X 5 aspect ratio - that means that for every 4 units of measurement in one direction (inches, millimeters, centimeters - whatever) there are 5 units in the other direction. That's why prints are often 8" X 10". Since I'm a little weird I like mine a little wider and since many movies and the new High Definition Televisions in the U.S. use a ratio of 16 X 9, I almost always crop my horizontal photos to 16 X 9. I leave most of my vertical photos in the 4 X 5 because 9 X 16 makes them look very skinny.




Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Thursday, July 15, 2010

The Beautiful Uintas

For those of us who live in Northern Utah it seems that "The Uintas" and "Mirror Lake" are almost synonymous though "Mirror Lake" is just one of the dozens of lakes in "The Uintas".  It's not even the biggest, and in my mind it's not necessarily the  prettiest though it certainly is picturesque.  For this photo below I caught it when it wasn't very mirror like because there was a bit of a breeze giving it quite a bit of texture. The long shadows give away that it is either late in the day or early. In this case it was only about an hour prior to sunset.





(f6.3, 1/125, 14mm, ISO 160)


As I'm sure you would suspect there are many beautiful treats for the eyes and this little spot where the two streams merge was no exception.  It was taken fairly early on day two of our trip.  





(f16, 1/13, 14mm, ISO 160)


I was so excited about our camping trip and getting everything ready that I actually walked out without my camera tripod. I learned many years ago that if you don't have a tripod lean against something solid or rest your camera on something, or worse case scenario spread your feet apart, relax and be your own bipod. This photo was hand held using that last method. I prefer the real tripod method.





Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

The Conqueror Returns

We're back. We spent the last 4 days and 3 nights conquering the wilderness of the Uinta mountains in the Wasatch National Forest. As the crow flies it's about 66 miles east by south east of our house. Driving was almost exactly double that. About 45 minutes after pulling in and while still in the process of getting set up we spotted these two friends having dinner about 50 to 70 yards from our camp.



(f4.2, 1/400, 108mm, ISO 160)


A couple days later I took this photo in the same meadow where the Moose were in the photo above. As they say: "Hey, it's a tough job but somebody's got to do it." You'll see more from this trip in coming posts.



(f9, 1/80, 39mm, ISO 160)



Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Hot Pink & Gold



(f8, 1/640, 50mm, ISO 160)





Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Oh Thank Heaven



(f8, 1/400, 50mm, ISO 160)




(f8, 1/250, 50mm, ISO 160)




Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Monday, July 12, 2010

Dirty Rotten Thief!


(f5.0, 1/500, 50mm, ISO 160)


Sometimes I feel like a dirty rotten thief. I take the gorgeous things that God has created and steal their image and then proudly display them as my own. They should say Copyright God. He doesn't even have to put them on a blog, he just scatters them around for everyone to enjoy - for free. It just doesn't get any better than this.

This photo and probably the next two days' are wild flowers I took a couple days ago after seeing Rick's post here. I had been promising myself I would get out and take these as I drove by them several times, but seeing Rick's post was the trigger I needed to "get-er-done".  Thanks Rick.

Oh, by the way.  This post was scheduled for posting today as I am up in the mountains (Hopefully stealing more images) and don't even have cell phone coverage, let alone Internet access for the next few days.  I'll be back towards the end of the week.




Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Sunday, July 11, 2010

Sunset Sunday - 21




(f3.5, 1 sec, 14mm, ISO 160)


This must be my week to switch it up a little bit. If you remember I switched it up a bit for Phun Phriday! and now I present a "Sunset Sunday" that isn't red or orange. Well if you need a Red or Orange sunset you can look up above at my July banner. That is that cable bridge in Kennewick, Washington. Today's Sunset Sunday photo is actually about 10 minutes after the sun had gone down and this is taken at almost a right angle, pointing very North instead of West where the sun goes down (at least here in Utah). Besides being my week to switch it up, after Tuesday's How Great Thou Art post and then this one it might also be called my Blue Week. Well maybe it's my "switched up blue week." Who cares? I just hope you enjoy the photographs and have a super day.

I promised to tell you about the JPEG compression on Phun Phriday's comparison post. All photos were saved at the same pixel dimensions.
Picture 1 was saved at Maximum (12) quality level and took up 798 Kb.
Picture 2 was saved at the lowest setting of "High" (8) quality level and took up 226 Kb.
Picture 3 again was Maximum (12)at 799 Kb.
Picture 4 was at 8 quality setting for 224 Kb

Level 8 takes up less than 1/3 of the space of level 12 and many of you saw a difference. The question is, then, is it worth it? Maybe I should compromise and save at level 10???

Personal observation and comments from my viewers revealed the following:  On my monitor that I do all my editing and viewing at home there is a difference but it is almost negligible with the quality level 12 winning out.  On my laptop (Much lower quality monitor) the difference is rather startling.   On the inexpensive business monitors at work the difference is also rather startling, like a 5 or 6.  Interesting that Karen and Jennyfreckles, who both have high end large Mac monitors, saw them differently than each other and Jennyfreckles preferred the photos with the lower quaility JPEG compression (more compression, lower quality).  A couple others reported a fairly strong difference.  The very unscientific results appear to be that the smaller and/or lower resolution monitors seem to accentuate the difference.  Of course I don't know what resolution my viewers have their monitors set to either.  Their monitors may be capable of higher resolution than they are using.  The one thing I know is that I will no longer feel good about saving at a JPEG 8 quality.  I may have to try a similar experiment comparing level 12 and level 10 and see how much difference I get.

Okay - back to Sunset Sunday.
If you have a Sunset photo you'd like to share, I'd love to see it. Please leave a link to it in your comment. No Sunset photo to share??? I'd love to read your comment anyway.







Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Saturday, July 10, 2010

St. Patrick's Day - Again?


(f6.3, 1/100, 14mm, ISO 160)


I loved the verdant green of the seaweed draped over the rocks. I knew I'd forget to post this next St. Patrick's day so I thought I'd do it now. You will see more somewhat like this if future posts.

Do not read the following unless you are my wife:  Happy Anniversary Honey.  37 wonderful years.  I would do it again.



Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Friday, July 09, 2010

Phun Phriday! # 22 - Tell Me About It

This is going to be a little (okay a lot) different angle on Phun Phriday! since I'm not going very far out of the box. However, this Phun Phriday! you get to have the Phun. All of us have different monitors that we view the images on and I know some of you out there undoubtedly have very high end ones. Mine is more of a medium level one and at work I check the blog on a low end "business quality" monitor.  I know the photos look different on different monitors.  I'd like to know more about what you see.

Images # 1 and # 2 are identical (The frame and the water mark may be very slightly different) except I saved them at different JPEG quality levels. I'd appreciate it if you would look at the quality of the image and tell me how much different you can see on your monitor with "0" meaning I don't see any difference and "10" meaning I don't believe they are the same photo. Of course I need to know which one is the better of the two. I Do suggest you click on each one to enlarge it to see it at full viewing size.

# 1


# 2

Images # 3 and # 4 are also identical and I'd like you to tell me the same things on them, comparing them against each other not against # 1 and/or # 2.
# 3


# 4

And finally, and this is purely subjective, which do you like better between the black background and the natural background?

I will tell you the JPEG settings and the voting results on Sunday, with my Sunset Sunday post.

Have you done something outside of the box recently? We'd love to see it. Just leave a link to it in your comment. If not, I hope you'll feel free to comment anyway.



Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Thursday, July 08, 2010

Good Morning Zions



(f22, 1/13, 14mm, ISO 160)

The morning sun lights up the beautiful hills of Zions National Park.



Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

How Great Thou Art

(f11, 1/1600, 70mm, ISO 160)


As I was preparing this photo for posting on my blog the words of the magnificent hymn How Great Thou Art kept ringing through my head.


O Lord my God,
When I in awesome wonder
Consider all
The worlds Thy Hand hath made,
I see the stars,
I hear the rolling thunder,
Thy pow'r throughout
The universe displayed;
 
Then sings my soul,
My Saviour God, to Thee,
How great Thou art!
How great Thou art!
Then sings my soul,
My Saviour God, to Thee,
How great Thou art!
How great Thou art!


Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Sunday, July 04, 2010

Sunset Sunday - 20



(f13, 1/60, 70mm, ISO 160)


You'll recognize this light house from Phun Phriday! just two days ago.  I don't get to see many lighthouses around the Great Salt Lake, so when I get to the coast and find one - watch out, I'm going to take advantage of it.  I thought this turned out pretty nice.

Today is Independence Day in the U.S.A.  It marks our 234th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, when we chose to separate ourselves from the King of England, but I'm sure glad we're such good friends now.  I may post something this afternoon to commemorate it, but I may not because it might detract from my Sunset Sunday.



Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Saturday, July 03, 2010

Stage Two





(f7.1, 1/400,169mm, ISO 160)


I went over to Krista's blog this morning and she had posted some lovely yellow dandelions.  It reminded me of these in the Stage Two development that I took a few weeks ago, so I decided to post them this morning.  Thanks Krista. 





Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Friday, July 02, 2010

Phun Phriday! # 21 - New Art


Hey kids . . . It's Phun Phriday! . . With your host Scott.  We're going to have some fun today and take a straight forward day time photo and turn it into an eerie night photo using Photoshop.  You may remember a few weeks back I posted one called Difference.  In that one I had originally taken two Identical photos except one was totally out of focus, and both were quite overexposed.  I then blended the two using the "difference" blending mode.

After getting back from Oregon I was wishing I had done something like that with this light house, but I didn't so I decided to make my own.  First step was to take the original photo - shown below -  and put it through both the lens blur filter and the gausian blur filter and just blur the heck out of it.  Next I took the original and laid it over top of the blurred image and again use the "difference" blend mode.  The top (original) is at about 70% opacity.  Oh, and since I had made a night shot out of it I did turn on the light in the top of the lighthouse.  I did not overexpose the images like I did in the meadow shot from a few weeks ago.  I may have to try that and see what happens, but of course the meadow shot from a few weeks ago was overexposed - and blurred - in the camera, not in photoshop.



Here's the original - SOOC.


Well kids, I hope you had PHUN today, and you know the deal - Have you done something outside of the box recently? We'd love to see it. Just leave a link to it in your comment. If not, I hope you'll feel free to comment anyway.






Don't be shy - leave a comment or email me.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Related Posts with Thumbnails